Robin F. Bachin 'Cane Talk

Robin Bachin

Youthquake: A New Politics for a New Generation
Charlton Copeland 'Cane Talk

Charlton Copeland

You Can't Do That: The Political Consequences of Fights About State and National Power
Casey Klofstad 'Cane Talk

Casey Klofstad

How Our Biology Influences Our Politics
Mark Richt's 'Cane Talk

Mark Richt

An intimate talk with Mark Richt about leadership
Orange Umbrella 'Cane Talks

Orange Umbrella

The Classroom Isn’t Big Enough: Orange Umbrella Student Consultancy
Robin F. Bachin 'Cane Talk

Robin Bachin

Youthquake: A New Politics for a New Generation

Charlton Copeland 'Cane Talk

Charlton Copeland

You Can't Do That: The Political Consequences of Fights About State and National Power

Casey Klofstad 'Cane Talk

Casey Klofstad

How Our Biology Influences Our Politics

Mark Richt's 'Cane Talk

Mark Richt

An intimate talk with Mark Richt about leadership

Orange Umbrella 'Cane Talks

Orange Umbrella

The Classroom Isn’t Big Enough: Orange Umbrella Student Consultancy

Welcome

The University of Miami introduces ’Cane Talks—lively ten-minute presentations by leading thinkers in the UM community illuminating big questions we face in the next century.

Researchers rank Florida as one of the least civically engaged states in the nation. Studies have painted the millennial generation as less likely to vote or contact elected officials. But as the oldest members of a new generation turn 21 this year, the ground is shifting.
In the U.S. our system of federalism allows the national government and states to have different policies on issues like minimum wage, educational testing, and government spending, among many other things. Join legal scholar Charlton Copeland to examine whether the American way of doing federalism allows people from all points of view the same leverage in policy debates that cross local and national jurisdictions.

A great deal of research has been conducted on voter behavior and the demographic characteristics of people who vote. Now, new research has begun to focus on how our biology also influences political behavior. Are there aspects of our biology that determine who we are more likely to support at the ballot box? Do those influence help us make better decisions?

So much is written about coaches developing athletes, but head coaches also have a unique responsibility to develop leadership among the coaches who collectively shape a team, its strengths and its culture. Coach Richt joined us for an intimate conversation about his philosophy and strategies for shaping a team of coaches who work together to nurture the next generation of athletes. 


At the University of Miami School of Communication, students are not waiting for summer or graduation to gain real-world experience. Through Orange Umbrella, a full service, student-run communication consultancy, students work in a real business with real clients. Their clientele span from within the university, to national campaigns in television and retail. Students across multiple disciplines get their creative juices flowing from outside the traditional classroom.
Dr. Erin Kobetz, Associate Director for Population Science and Cancer Disparity at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, is a champion for collaborative work that supports underserved communities as they seek greater access to health. Her journey as a scientist was transformed by her own cancer diagnosis, which inspired innovative approaches to prevent cancer in South Florida communities from Little Haiti to local fire stations.


Thanks to advances in immunology and an ever-improving understanding of genomics and proteomics – the role genes and proteins play in disease and its progression – scientists and clinicians are able to identify unique markers present on blood cancers and modify healthy cells from our own immune system to find and destroy them.  Hear from Dr. Komanduri about where the science is headed.
Nearly 100,000 people will be diagnosed with a brain tumor this year in the United States, and they will come from every age group and income bracket. The future is being rewritten for these patients by Ricardo J. Komotar, MD, the director of the University of Miami Brain Tumor Initiative, an internationally-recognized center translating research into new, minimally invasive strategies to treat and prevent brain tumors.


Many of South Florida’s most historic and architecturally significant buildings are vulnerable to flooding and sea level rise. Residents and business owners worry about how best to protect their homes and buildings. City planners want to know how to preserve vibrant neighborhoods in coastal communities, and elected officials seek sustainable approaches to guide future growth. 

Noise is a leading cause of hearing loss, yet most of us have no idea that our exposure everyday sounds -- at sporting events and concerts or from our earbuds – can be damaging our ears. Scientists at the UM College of Engineering and at Miller School of Medicine are uncovering clues about hidden hearing loss and are racing to produce solutions that can be implemented across the globe.

In the chaos of emergency rooms, environmental disasters and crises across the globe, healthcare providers make split-second decisions with lives in the balance. How do you prepare for that? Visit this new, cutting-edge Simulation Hospital and hear from Dr. Susana Barroso-Fernandez, Assistant Professor of Clinical and Director, Simulation Hospital Special Projects, about how simulation is saving lives and preparing us for a safer tomorrow.

Sharks are among the most mysterious and feared animals on the planet. Yet many shark species face their own deadly predator: humans. Learn about the cutting-edge work of University of Miami Rosenstiel School research professor and shark scientist Neil Hammershlag and the team at UM’s Shark Research and Conservation Program to save the world’s sharks.



Religious scholar Michelle Gonzalez Maldonado presents “Masking the Virgin Mary: La Caridad del Cobre and Religion’s Resiliency in Cuba,” revealing how the patron saint of Cuba, “La Caridad del Cobre,” has become a symbol of Cuba’s identity and exploring the complexity and resilience of the patron saint’s religious traditions.
Lillian Manzor, director of the University’s Cuban Digital Theater Archive, presents “Theater and Reconciliation: The Power of the Digital Diaspora,” discussing the roles that theater and digital culture can play in building community in a moment and across the fraught borders of time, space, and nations. 

Combining performance and personal reflection, award-winning composer and UM faculty member Gonzalo Rubalcaba presents “La Música en Mi/The Music in Me,” exploring his roots in Cuba and how his music has evolved to reflect a global complexity from the island and beyond (in Spanish).

How do decision-makers in today's organizations balance the need for profits and progress while avoiding putting others at risk? Business professor Anita Cava, director of UM's Business Ethics Program, addresses how leaders can see more clearly when faced with tough decisions.


A healthy democracy relies on citizens making choices based on accurate information. This is especially challenging in our age of ubiquitous social media and fake news. Political science professor Joseph Uscinski discusses what the recent presidential campaign reveals about how Americans make political choices. 
Climate modeler Ben Kirtman employs one of the world’s largest supercomputers to more accurately predict the risk of severe flooding, which has been exacerbated by sea level rise. Professor Kirtman, an advisor to the United Nations, describes what his research means for cities across the globe.


Physicist Neil Johnson presents "Terrorism 15 years After 9/11: What the Rise of the Internet Can Tell Us About the Rise of ISIS." The internet has changed the way terrorists communicate and plan—and also how terrorist plots can be monitored and stopped. How can big data be harnessed to combat terrorism?
Dean Shelly Berg presents "Revolutionizing Music Education: The Frost School at the Forefront." Lectures might be a great way to teach people about things, but they aren’t a great way to teach people to do things. At the Frost School of Music the faculty has reinvented how musicians are prepared.


Environmental anthropologist Kenny Broad presents "Exploring the Invisible: Climate, Caves, and Culture." Beneath our feet lies one of the most inhospitable environments on earth: underwater caves. Pushing the limits of the extreme, exploring this inner space can help answer fundamental questions.

From “America’s Winter Playground” to “the Gateway of the Americas,” playwright Tarell McCraney presents "The Distant Present: A Look at Miami’s Future as a Global Artistic Gateway" and explores Miami’s distinctive mixture of worlds.

UM is a global institution that reaches across the borders of geography, identity, and discipline. Mateus Lima, a member of the Class of 2017 from Brazil shares his journey to South Florida in "Choosing Not to Choose: In Praise of Life at the Intersections in Culture, Science, and Policy."
Attention is necessary for everything we do—from learning, to making decisions, to regulating our mood. Yet our capacity to pay attention is limited when we are under stress. Amishi Jha, associate professor in the Department of Psychology, presents "Training the Brain to Be More Attentive: How Elite Athletes, Military Personnel, and Others Perform Better Under Stress."



Tables that tweet. Coffee cups that curate messages. Facades that fuel displays. This talk by Architecture Dean Rodolphe el-Khoury invites the audience to imagine how our built environment will be transformed by information technology.
Join one of the nation’s most prolific researchers on HIV/AIDS to learn more about the journey medical professionals have taken to treat this disease. For more than 20 years Margaret Fischl has been part of the team that built the University of Miami AIDS Clinical Research Unit.

American public schools are a critical part of how we hope to prepare citizens for our democracy. Yet while they hold the promise for an egalitarian future, law professor Osamudia James argues in her presentation "How I Became Comfortable as That Lady: Racial Identity, Silence, and Equality in American Public Schools" that they also simultaneously entrench deep racial inequality.

From crime statistics to public school test scores, citizens have the ability to access mountains of data on issues that impact their lives locally and globally. Alberto Cairo is the Knight Chair in Visual Journalism at the School of Communication and presents "Unlocking Information: The Power of Data Visualization for Journalists, Scientists, and the Rest of Us."


Entrepreneur, author, fashion designer, and academic Neri Karra, a member of the University of Miami Class of 1999, recounts her personal journey from a Bulgarian vineyard to a Turkish refugee camp to the University of Miami campus.